Courses with Attributes A, E, D, Q, C

Here’s a big DRAFT LIST of courses that have attributes.

This includes A, E, D, Q, C.

Alaska and Arctic Issues

Courses with attribute A   that satisfy  Learning Outcome #3 have not yet been decided on by  faculty. Such courses would satisfy the Alaska and Arctic Issues Rubric  and will probably be assessed by some subcommittee of the Core Review Committee.

DRAFT COURSE LIST

  • ANS F101 Introduction to Alaska Native Studies (h)(a)
  • ANS F111/ HIST 110   History of Alaska Natives (s)(a)
  • ANS F150 Topics in Alaska Regional Cultural History (s)(a)
  • ANS F202X Aesthetic Appreciation of Alaska Native Performance (h)(a)
  • ANS / MUS F223 Alaska Native Music (h)(a)
  • ANS F250 Current Alaska Native Leadership Perspectives (s)(a)
  • ANS F310 Indigenous Land Settlements (s)(a)
  • ANS F315 Tribal People and Development (s)(a)
  • ANS/PS F325 Native Self Government (s)(a)
  • ANS/ENG F349 Narrative Art of Alaska Native Peoples (in English Translation) (h)(a)
  • ANS F350 W,O Cross Cultural Communication: Alaskan Perspectives (s)(a)
  • ANS F381 W Alaska Natives in Film (h)(a)
  • ANS F401 Cultural Knowledge of Native Elders (h)(a)
  • ANS F420 Alaska Native Education (s)(a)
  • ANS/PS F425 Federal Indian Law and Alaska Natives (s)(a)
  • ANS/ED F461 Native Ways of Knowing (h)(a)
  • ANS F472 W Rural Alaska, Natives and the Press (h)(a)
  • ANS F475 Alaska Native Social Change (s)(a)
  • ANTH F242 Native Cultures of Alaska (s)(a)
  • ANTH F302 Siberia: Past, Present, Future (s)(a)
  • ANTH F309 Circumpolar Archaeology (s)(a)
  • ANTH/ANS F320 W Language and Culture in Alaska (s)(a)
  • ANTH F365 W Native Art of Alaska (h)(a)
  • ANTH F383 Athabascan Peoples of Alaska and Adjacent Canada (s)
  • ANTH F472 Culture and History in the North Atlantic (s)
  • ART/ANS F365 W Native Art of Alaska (h)(a)
  • ART F424 O Field Artists of the North (h)(a)
  • ART F425 W Visual Images of the North (a)
  • BIOL F104X Natural History of Alaska (n)(a)
  • BIOL F288 Fish and Fisheries of Alaska (a)
  • BIOL F488 Arctic Vegetation Ecology: Geobotany (not sure this makes sense as there are several prereq’s)
  • ED F420 Alaska Native Education (s)(a)
  • ED F456 Orientation to Teaching in Rural Alaska (a)
  • ED F462 Alaskan Environmental Education (a)
  • ENGL F219 Aleut Narrative Art (a)
  • ENGL F341 Contemporary Alaska Native Literature (h)(a)
  • ENGL F350 Literature of Alaska and the Yukon Territory (h)(a)
  • GEOG F302 Geography of Alaska (s)(a)
  • GEOG F306 Geography of Russia (s)(a)
  • GEOG F427 Polar Geography (s)(a)
  • GEOS F212 Geology of Alaska (a)
  • GEOS F330 The Dynamic Alaskan Coastline
  • HIST F115 Alaska, Land and Its People (s)(a)
  • HIST F404 W Modern Scandinavia (s)(a)
  • HIST F461 W History of Alaska (s)(a)
  • HIST F463 Imperial Russia, 1700-1917 (s)(a)
  • HIST F464 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia (s)(a)
  • HIST F481 Polar Exploration and its Literature (s)(a)
  • HIST F483 W 20th Century Circumpolar History (s)(a)
  • JRN F440 Ethics and Reporting in the Far North
  • NORS F484 W,O Seminar in Northern Studies (s)(a)
  • PS F263 Alaska Native Politics (s)(a)
  • PS F452 International Relations of the North (s)(a)
  • PS F460 W Government and Politics of Canada (s)(a)
  • PS F462 Alaska Government and Politics (s)(a)
  • PS F468 W Government and Politics of Russia (s)(a)
  • RD F200 Rural Development in the North (s)(a)
  • RD F245 Fisheries Development in Rural Alaska (s)(a)
  • RD F255 Rural Alaska Land Issues (s)(a)
  • RD F265 Perspectives on Subsistence in Alaska (a)
  • RD F465 Community Healing and Wellness (a)
  • RD F470 The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act: Pre-1971 to present
  • Russian language, culture and literature courses
  • SWK F320 W Rural Social Work (a)
  • THR F361 Advanced Alaska Native Performance (a)
  • TM F101 Introduction to Tribal Government (a)
  • TM F201 Advanced Tribal Government (a)

Civic Engagement

Courses with attribute  E  that satisfy Learning Outcome #3 have not yet been decided on by  faculty. Such courses would satisfy the  Civic Engagement Rubric  and will probably be assessed by some subcommittee of the Core Review Committee.

DRAFT COURSE LIST

  • INTENTIONALLY LEFT FOR FACULTY TO DECIDE AND IMAGINE.

Intercultural Competence and Diversity

Courses with attribute D  that satisfy  Learning Outcome #3 have not yet been decided on by  faculty. Such courses would satisfy the  Intercultural Competence and Diversity Rubric  and will probably be assessed by some subcommittee of the Core Review Committee.

DRAFT COURSE LIST

  • ANL 151, Interethnic Communications
  • ANS 242/ANTH 242, Native cultures of Alaska
  • ANS 347, Voices of Native American Peoples
  • ANS 350, Cross Cultural Communication: Alaskan Perspectives
  • ANS370, Issues in Alaska Bilingual and multicultural Education
  • ANS 375, Native American Religion and Philosophy
  • ANS 401, Cultural Knowledge of Native Elders
  • ANS 462 Native Ways of Knowing
  • ANS 475, Alaska Native Social Change
  • ANTH 100x, Idividual, Society and Culture
  • ANTH 215, Fundamentals of Social/Cultural Anthropology
  • ANTH 225, Anthropology of Race
  • ANTH 301, World Ethnography
  • ANTH 308, Language and Gender
  • ANTH 320, Language and Culture in Alaska
  • ANTH 409, Anthropology of Religion
  • ANTH 445, Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
  • ANTH 460, Cross-Cultural Filmmaking
  • COMM/WGS 351, Gender and Communication
  • COMM 380, Communication and Diversity
  • ECE 130, Culture, Learning and the Young Child
  • ECE 230, Introduction to Children with Special Needs
  • ECE 240, Inclusion of Children with Special Needs
  • ECE405, Seminar in Culture and Child Rearing Practices
  • ECON 111, Economics of Rural Alaska
  • ED 380, Cultural Influences in Education
  • ED/WGS 440, Gender and Education
  • EDSE 482, Inclusive Classrooms in All Children
  • ENGL 200x, World Literature
  • ENGL/WGS 333, Women’s literature
  • ENGL 340, Contemporary Native American Literature
  • ENGL 341, Contemporary Alaska Native Literature
  • ENGL 460, Studies in Comparative World Literature
  • FLM 460, Cross-Cultural Filmmaking
  • FL 200X, World Literature
  • GEOG 312, People, Places, and Environment: Principles of Human Geography
  • HIST/WGS 325, History of Sexuality
  • HIST 424, Topics in Women’s History
  • JRN/WGS 380, Women, Minorities, and the Media
  • JUST/WGS 335, Gender and Crime
  • LING 308, Language and Gender
  • NORS 484, Seminar in Northern Studies
  • PS/WGS 340, Women and Politics
  • PSY 201, Culture and Psychology
  • PSY/WGS 333, Human Sexualities Across Cultures
  • PSY/WGS 360 Psychology of Women Across Cultures
  • RD/WGS 460, Women and Development
  • SWK 350, Women’s Issues in Social Welfare and Social Work Practices
  • SOC 100X, Individual, Society and  Culture
  • SOC 263, Social Inequality and Stratification
  • SOC 308, Race and Ethnic Relations
  • SOC 310 , Sociology of Aging
  • SOC/WGS 320, Sociology of Gender
  • SOC 333, Human Sexualities Across Cultures
  • WGS 201, Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies
  • WGS 202, History of Women in America
  • WGS 308, Language and Gender
  • WGS 348, Native North American Women
  • WGS 403, Theories in Women’s and Gender Studies
  • WGS 410, Women in Music History
  • WGS 445, Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspectives
  • Any course in Alaska Native Languages (ANL) or Foreign Languages (FLL)

 

Quantitative Literacy

Courses with attribute Q  that satisfy  Learning Outcome #2 have not yet been decided on by faculty. Such courses would satisfy the  Quantitative Literacy Rubric  and will probably be assessed by some subcommittee of the Core Review Committee.

It is anticipated that all courses listed as fulfilling the Natural Science requirement or Mathematics requirement of Learning Outcome 1 will also satisfy the Q requirement, but there are courses in other departments/colleges that will/should satisfy the Q requirement (e.g., ES 208).

DRAFT COURSE LIST

  • ATM F101X—Weather and Climate of Alaska (4)
  • BIOL F100X—Human Biology (4)
  • BIOL F101X—Biology of Sex (4)
  • BIOL F103X—Biology and Society (4)
  • BIOL F104X—Natural History (4)
  • BIOL F115X—Fundamentals of Biology I (4)
  • BIOL F116X—Fundamentals of Biology II (4)
  • BIOL F120X—Introduction to Human Nutrition (4)
  • BIOL F213X—Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
  • BIOL F214X—Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
  • CHEM F100X—Chemistry in Complex Systems (4)
  • CHEM F103X—Basic General Chemistry (4)
  • CHEM F104X—Beginnings in Biochemistry (4)
  • CHEM F105X—General Chemistry (4)
  • CHEM F106X—General Chemistry (4)
  • ES 101 — Introduction to Engineering
  • ES F208 — Mechanics
  • ES F209 — Statics
  • ES F210 Dynamics
  • GEOG F111X—Earth and Environment: Elements of Physical Geography (4)
  • GEOS F100X—Introduction to Earth Science (4)
  • GEOS F101X—The Dynamic Earth (4)
  • GEOS F106X—Life and the Age of Dinosaurs (4)
  • GEOS F112X—History of Earth and Life (4)
  • GEOS F120X—Glaciers, Earthquakes and Volcanoes (4)
  • GEOS F125X—Humans, Earth and Environment (4)
  • MATH 161 – Algebra for Business and Economics (3)
  • MATH 262 – Calculus for Business and Economics (4)
  • MATH 272 – Calculus for the life sciences (4)
  • MATH F200X–Calculus I (4)
  • MATH F201X–Calculus II (4)
  • MATH F202X–Calculus III (4)
  • MATH F215–Introduction to Mathematical Proofs (3)
  • MATH F314–Linear Algebra (3)
  • MATH F302–Differential Equations (3)
  • MATH 307 — Discrete Mathematics (3)
  • MSL F111X—The Oceans (4)
  • PHYS F102X—Energy and Society (4)
  • PHYS F103X—College Physics (4)
  • PHYS F104X—College Physics (4)
  • PHYS F115X—Physical Science I (4)
  • PHYS F175X—Astronomy (4)
  • PHYS F211X—General Physics (4)
  • PHYS F212X—General Physics (4)
  • PHYS F213X—Elementary Modern Physics (4)
  • PSY/SOC F250–Introductory Statistics for Social Sciences (3)
  • PSY F475W–Research Design and Analysis in Psychology
  • STAT F200X–Elementary Probability and Statistics (3)
  • STAT F300–Statistics (3)
  • STAT F401–Regression and Analysis of Variance (4)
  • ABUS F273 Managing A Small Business
  • ANTH F424 Analytical Techniques
  • ABUS F274 E-commerce
  • CE F451 Construction Cost Estimating and Bid Preparation
  • CHEM F313 Chemical Analysis of Dynamic Systems
  • ENVI F110 Introduction to Water Quality I: Measurement
  • Geog 435 GIS Analysis
  • HSEM F434 All Hazards Risk Analysis
  • HSEM F412 Emergency Planning and Preparedness
  • JUST F401 Cross-cultural Conflict Analysis and Intervention
  • NRM F304 Environmental Decision Making
  • PSY F275 Introduction to Social Science Research Methods

Communication across the curriculum and in the major

Courses with attribute  C  that satisfy  Learning Outcome #4  have not yet been decided on by  faculty. Such courses would satisfy the  Communication Synthesis Rubric  and will probably be assessed by some subcommittee of the Core Review Committee.

It is anticipated that many majors’ current O and W courses can be revised to meet the new requirements of Communication across the Curriculum at the upper-division level.

DRAFT COURSE LIST

 

5 Replies to “Courses with Attributes A, E, D, Q, C”

  1. I HOPE that the course listings are just potential examples. I was not able to find any indication of how the REAL courses will be selected. What will be the application process for all courses that will satisfy one or more of the attributes? This application process should start at the beginning (t0) and be carried out in the future when new courses are developed.

  2. I have a suggestion for the “Subject Areas” portion of the description of the “A” attribute. I think it would be appropriate to add another: “Cultural productions of Alaskan/Arctic peoples or about Alaskan/Arctic places.”

  3. I strongly oppose merging the writing (W) requirement into a much broader “communication” (C) requirement that allows students to avoid taking any writing classes. If the C requirement is implemented, the students who most need to work on writing likely will avoid writing classes because they don’t want to do the work and/or they don’t think writing is relevant in today’s e-communication world. More and more, students are writing the way they speak or “write” in text messages and tweets: They use incomplete sentences, ignore the rules of grammar, punctuation, and capitalization, and, worst of all, write in a stream-of-consciousness style that lacks any logical organization. Effective written communication remains essential for conveying and recording substantive and complex information. If anything, our students need more, not less, training in writing.

  4. Many of the draft courses do not seem to focus on “inquiry and analysis, or problem solving” but instead seem to be introduction to field courses, for example, introduction to biology, earth science, life and age of dionsaurs, oceans, etc. I think there is less analysis or problem solving in these type of courses compared to quantitative courses such as
    MATH 262 — Calculus for Business and Economics (4)
    PSY/SOC F250—Introductory Statistics for Social Sciences (3)
    PSY F475W—Research Design and Analysis in Psychology
    STAT F200X—Elementary Probability and Statistics (3)
    and so on.

    I expected classes that teach analysis and problem solving such as:
    ABUS F273 Managing A Small Business
    ANTH F424 Analytical Techniques
    ABUS F274 E-commerce
    CE F451 Construction Cost Estimating and Bid Preparation
    CHEM F313 Chemical Analysis of Dynamic Systems
    ENVI F110 Introduction to Water Quality I: Measurement
    Geog 435 GIS Analysis
    HSEM F434 All Hazards Risk Analysis
    HSEM F412 Emergency Planning and Preparedness
    JUST F401 Cross-cultural Conflict Analysis and Intervention
    NRM F304 Environmental Decision Making
    PSY F275 Introduction to Social Science Research Methods

    • I really appreciate this feedback—this is exactly what we hope will happen, that faculty who are familiar with certain parts of the curriculum can identify particular courses that seem like they should satisfy a particular attribute and suggest them for consideration! I agree, these all seem like plausible courses; their omission from the draft list was simply because I didn’t know about them and didn’t see them in a fast scan of the catalog.

      Note that in discussions with natural science faculty about the potential Q requirement, they have indicated that the introductory lab science courses also feature a significant amount of “inquiry and analysis, or problem solving”. But of course, should the GER proposal go forward, a mechanism would need to be developed (e.g., a Q committee?) to determine which current (or newly proposed) courses should receive the attribute.

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